TPT Lessons

TPT Lessons
Complete Art Lessons

TPT Letters

TPT Letters
Bulletin Board Letters

TPT Art Resource

TPT Art Resource
Art Education Resources

Winter Value Landscapes (2nd)


I think out of every project I teach - this one has to be one of my absolute favorites. EVERY child is successful on some level.. and each piece of artwork created is gorgeous. This is one of those projects that hangs up in the hallway and gets "oooohhhs" and "aahhhhs" every time a class and/or teachers walk by! :)

Lovely hall display!
We begin by looking at my new and improved 'Value PPT'. I sunk like 2 hours into this baby getting it animated and awesome.
I am always mesmerized by this every
time I go to Wal-Mart. :)
We talk about value referring to the lightness or darkness of a color (and no - when I say value.. I'm not talking about money - the kids ALWAYS answer this when I ask them what 'value' is). We look at a variety of images showing value scales including a wall of paint chips (which the kids love because they have all seen this before). Then we talk about what a "tint" (color + white) is... and what a "shade" (color + black) is.
Then I show them an image showing a paper filled with progressively darker concentric blue circles... and ask them how they think the artist created this. Because the circles appear to get darker.. the kids naturally say "the artist created shades!" Ahhh but this one is a tricky one I tell them... because black was never added to the blue! Instead the color blue was added to the color white until it became a pure blue by the time it reached the final outer circles on the page. Then comes the awesome animated part of my PPT - I created a bunch of slides which demonstrates how to slowly add blue to the color white to paint progressively 'purer' blues; then I demonstrate in real life.
Each set of students gets a paint palette top (the clear plastic circular lids work awesome for holding paint puddles) and a puddle of white and blue tempera paint. Students then begin by painting their pure white moon in the upper part of their page (exactly where is up to them). Then they dip the tip of their paintbrush into their blue puddle and slowly mix the blue paint on their brush into the white puddle (this creates a very light tint of blue). They use this to paint a concentric circle around their white moon. Then they repeat this process until their entire page is filled with progressively darker blues.
Once they are done, our paintings go into the drying rack until the next day!
On day two.. we begin by drawing a horizon line on our papers for our winter scene to take place in. We talk about how the horizon line should be further up the page so that we can show a lot of the foreground and middle ground in our pictures. Then they paint this space in with white tempera. The white tempera doesn't completely cover the blue background opaquely.. which ends up actually being a really nice and desired effect as the various streaks of blue helps to create the illusion of depth.
Once the white ground is painted, we go back to the projector and talk about what silhouette is (the dark shape of someone or something visible against a lighter background). I then ask students to think about a time that they've seen a silhouette. Lots of my students answer with 'trees at sunset' which is a great answer as it leads us into what we are going to paint next - bare tree silhouettes.
Painting bare trees can definitely be a challenge for all students.. but if you break it down for them and show them what not to do.. it helps them to be a bit more successful with their paintings.
I tell them to start with the trunk of their tree... then start adding 'Y' branches onto their trunk (they are just branches that create a 'Y' shape on their trunks. As the branches get higher up on the tree.. they will appear to become skinnier and more sparse. I also remind them that trees grow UPWARD.. so when they are adding branches.. they shouldn't draw upside-down 'Y's and that trees typically do not grow completely symmetrical.. so they want their branches to be somewhat asymmetrical. :)
"Snowmen at Night"
by Caralyn Buehner
Students practice painting tree silhouettes on a scrap piece of paper.. and then when they are done practicing.. they start adding trees to their winter landscapes. We do also talk about placement on the ground and how trees that appear closer will look larger and will begin closer to the bottom of our page.. while trees that are farther away will appear smaller and will begin closer to the horizon line on their page.
The following day, we begin class by reading the book "Snowmen at Night" by Caralyn Buehner. The illustrations in this book are a beautiful example of how tints and shades can be used to create highlights and shadows on shapes to help give them the illusion of form (like the spheres that make up a snowman's body).
We also talk about using a light source (like the moon) to position highlights and shadows more accurately and how shadows on shapes are not always created with black (we examine the picture to the right). Students then go back to their tables and use white paint to add the bodies of snowmen to their artwork. A streak of light blue is added for the "shadow" on the backside of the snowman.
Finally, on the last day we begin by talking about cast shadows and details to add to our winter landscapes. We talk once again about directional light.. and how the light from the moon will cause a cast shadow off of the figures in our landscape (like the snowmen and trees). We then also predict where the cast shadow will fall (based on the positioning of the moon on each students paper).
As the students begin adding cast shadows and details to their papers with colored pencils, I read the book "Snowmen at Work" (the sequel to "Snowmen at Night"). This book is filled with more bright colorful decorative pages of snowmen doing various jobs. It's great inspiration for the kids!








Picasso'esque snowmen. I LOVE it! :)

If you are interested in a more thoroughly written lesson with step-by-step teacher procedures, a simplified student handout, and a how to video - check out my Teachers Pay Teachers store!!


4

Aquarium Art (3rd)

Teachers Sample
(Although it's missing its fish) *Woops
EQ: How can the ocean inspire our art? What is an aquarium? 

Every good idea comes from a pin ;)

So for this one I started out with a PowerPoint which looked at a topographical map of Georgia. We talked about how Georgia has lots of lakes and rivers (which are freshwater) and has a coastline (saltwater) too! Then we examined the difference between the fish that lived in each. We found that the fish found in Georgia's freshwaters were often browns/greys/whites in color and that many of the fish found near Georgia's saltwater coast have more variety in color (blues, reds, etc). I asked students why they thought this was and surprisingly had a lot of students suggest it was because of the fish' need to camouflage in their environments to hide from predators! They're so smart! :D
So I set up a "river/ocean" in the front of my room (with blue butcher paper) and scattered out some color fish printouts that I cutout and attached paperclips to. Students "went fishing" (with a pole with a magnet attached to a fishing line) and selected a fish. Then they went back to their desks and drew their best version of their fish.. and then on the back of a paper plate wrote at least 3 facts about their fish (I had attached about a paragraph of info on the back of each fish).
Red Snapper
The next day we came in and I gave each student a piece of aluminum foil. Students cut a circle the same size as their plate out of the foil and glued it to the inside of their paper plates. A background was then added onto the foil with colored sharpies.
The next day we came in and students were given a second paper plate (this one was a little heavier than the first) and they painted the outer ring of their plate silver (for the outside of their aquarium). Then we put these on the drying rack and met on the carpet to read Eric Carle's "Mister Seahorse." This book has GREAT illustrations and really plays off the idea of fish camouflaging into their environments. Once we were done, students went back to their desks and were given a piece of transparency paper and were asked to draw something for their fish to camouflage behind.
The next day students came in and cut out the middle part of their silver-painted plate and hot-glued (okay.. well I hot-glued) their transparency papers (clear plastic) onto their silver rings.
Then students cut out their fish drawing and taped a piece of fishing line to the back of it. A bead was tied to the other end. Then it was time to assemble the aquariums! The fish was placed on the foil background with the string/bead hanging off the plate. The cover was then sat on top and stapled to the back plate (two staples on the top to trap the fishing line and one on the bottom). I left the sides of the aquarium un-stapled so if the students fish got stuck they could slide their hands in and readjust them.
If this project description sounds at all confusing - I apologize. There's a lot of steps and I didn't really want to bore you with every single detail.. but if you have an specific questions - feel free to ask! :)
 
Student Sample: Out in the open!
Student Sample: Hiding behind some coral!

Student Sample

Student Sample
Student Sample

Student Sample

Student Sample

Student Sample


Student Sample: Love this one!!
Student Samples

Hall Display

Hall Display

0

Art Club Jellyfish


I saw this lesson on Pinterest and I've been waiting to do this project with a group -- and I FINALLY got the opportunity to with my art club! It took us two 50-minute periods before school to complete.... and I LOVE them!

Day One: We start by wetting the backside of a paper bowl with water.. then use liquid watercolors to "tye-dye" the surface (wet-on-wet technique).
Next each student colors (or "scribble-scrabbles) a coffee filter with washable markers (I only gave them primary colors). Once finished I came around with a spray bottle of water and sprayed their filters (this causes the ink from the markers to spread and mix). These were moved onto a plastic lid and then placed on the drying rack.
Spiral cut example
Day Two: Students make a spiral cut on their coffee filters to make a long ribbon-like piece that will then be divided into four equal parts and used for the tentacles (taped onto the inner-sides of their bowl). Then I gave my kids a plain un-colored coffee filter - they cut this the same way (spiral cut). The white-ribbon is then cut into even pieces and taped into the inside-center of their bowl (for the oral arms).
We then used white paper to make eyes for their jellyfish and these are taped on as well.
Lastly, I came around and punctured two holes into the top of each bowl (with a sgraffito tool) and a piece of fishing line is strung through and tied (so the jellyfish can be hung up).




0

Alligator Weaving (1st)


Teacher Sample
So before I begin, I HAVE to give a shoutout to Lauren at Dali's Moustache for the inspiration for this lesson!
To begin this project, I review with my students what we learned about color mixing during their last rotation with me (primary color + primary color = secondary color).
Next we create a piece of painted paper (9"x12") using yellow and blue tempera paint (yellow+blue=green). Instead of mixing their colors on a palette they just paint each primary color directly on their paper and mix their paints that way. I LOVE the variety of greens they can make this way! :) Then using a variety of tools (plastic spoons, popsicle sticks, etc.), students "draw" patterns and shapes into their paint. Once completed we put these up on the drying rack.
After school I pulled out their painted papers and cut them down into strips (1.5"x6.5"). I also created looms for weaving using green construction paper (9" x 6.5"). When they came in the next day, we used our painted paper strips and weaved them into the looms. This became the body for our gators. :)
The next day we started adding more detail to our alligators by adding a head (cut from a 6"x4.5" piece of green construction paper), a tail (also from a 6"x4.5" piece of green construction paper), 4 feet, eyes, and teeth. Then on the final day, students had additional time to finish up adding all their details and had the opportunity to use gold paint to add some detail/decoration to their alligators.
Overall I think they turned out great! I was surprised however how difficult weaving was for some of my kids! Guess I need to practice this skill with my kinders so when they get to 1st grade they already have some basic experience with it.

UPDATE: With my next group of 1st graders I had them number the strips (the warp) on their looms 1-5. Then when I was demonstrating how to weave I explained their strip (the weft) needed to go "under 1, over 2, under 3, over 4, under 5".. then with the next strip we did the opposite - "over 1, under 2, over 3, under 4, over 5". THIS HELPED GREATLY! I had a MUCH higher success rate with my students this week since I added the numbering.






If you're interested in other animal weaving projects, check out my Teachers Pay Teachers store!


3

Oil Pastel Solar Systems (5th)

EQ: How can I create the illusion of form with color?

For this lesson we began by comparing and contrasting an image of a circle and a sphere and talked about what attributes made the sphere look 3D compared to the circle. After talking, we decided that it was really the use of highlights and shadows on the sphere that made it look 3D. This led us into a conversation about value, tints, and shades as a tool to create the illusion of form. Then we transitioned to a PowerPoint I put together about the solar system and each of the individual planets (I included at least 3 cool facts about each - GREAT science integration).
Using compasses, students drew 8-9 (depending on whether they wanted to include Pluto or not) circles on a sheet of white paper for each of the planets - they tried to size them relative to one another. Then using oil pastels, they colored in the planets trying to use the correct colors for each planet and added white pastel to create highlights and black pastels on the opposite side to create shadows.
Once these were finished, my students cut out their planets and glued them to a 12"x18" piece of black construction paper. Then using construction paper crayons, students added a sun (the light source for the highlights) and any other details (planet rings, stars, rocket ships, etc.).
My 5th graders really liked this lesson! At this age they're really into outer space and I think having that element really engaged my students.

I think next time I teach this one I will give them a smaller sheet of white drawing paper for the planets so that when cut out they will fit better on the black paper.

Student Sample
Student Sample

Student Sample

Student Sample



0

Pop Art Plushies (5th)

Teacher Sample
EQ: What is pop art?

So this is a lesson that I have absolutely LOVED doing with my 5th graders (and they've just as equally loved doing with me)! :)

The first day of the lesson I showed my students a PowerPoint presentation about Pop Art. We talked about where it came from (born out of the resistance to Abstract Expressionism), what it was and what it was about (making art available to everyone and turning it into a commodity), and viewed artwork created by some of my favorite pop artists! We looked at Warhol's soup can prints/paintings and talked about mass production, looked at Lichtenstein's paintings and talked about advertisements and comic strips (and pop culture in general) being sources of inspiration, looked at Oldenburg's giant outdoor sculptures and his giant soft sculptures, and then finally looked at contemporary soft-sculpture artist - Heidi Kenney. If you've never heard of Kenney before.. you should definitely check her out! She creates the most adorable soft sculptures you've ever seen and the kids just absolutely love her work! Her designs were actually picked up by 'kidrobot' which now produces and sells her plushies, so you can find them in stores (I picked up one of her lime plushies at Barnes and Noble the other week)!
Artwork by Heidi Kenney
So with the idea of pop culture as a source of inspiration for our art in mind, I introduce the inspiration for our project -- soft sculpture ANGRY BIRDS!
What elementary-aged student doesn't LOVE this game?! :)
 I must admit - this project required a lot of prep-work from my end (like creating body part stencils for 4 different angry bird characters out of posterboard for each of my 6 tables).. but I think it was well worth it!
After the PowerPoint is over, I had my kids select which angry bird they wanted to create, and then use the body part stencils at their table to trace their bird (or pig) onto a sheet of drawing paper. These drawings were colored in with crayon (to help me identify what colors of felt I'd need to have pulled out the next class) and then were used throughout the project as a folder to hold all my student's felt body part pieces.
When my kids came in the next day, we pulled out our papers and I called each table up one-by-one to select a sheet of felt to be used for their body. Using the tracers, they traced a front and a back onto the felt with sharpies and then cut them out. Then using an assortment of felt scraps, they cut out their other body parts (such as head-feathers, eyes, eyebrows, beaks, etc). Some students even created their own additional pieces (such as bows for some lady angry birds)!
The sewing process was definitely confusing for some kids at first, but after a short time they all ended up picking it up quite successfully.
Student Samples Group Shot
I could go into extensive detail about my sewing process.. but I'll save you the reading. ;) Here's the gist: Using yarn needles (the big thick metal ones), we threaded our yarn and tied a knot at the end ("but not the way you tie your shoes - instead like how you tie a balloon"), and then began sewing. Instead of weaving in and out, I had students loop the yarn around and always enter the needle in through the same side (this stitch just ended up looking nicer in the end).
Once our front and back pieces were nearly completely stitched up, we stuffed them with a polyester filling, then finished sewing them up. Then using tacky glue, students glued on the rest of their pieces.

Both weeks I've taught this lesson it has taken me the full 5 days of class time (I see my kids Monday-Friday for each of their rotations).. so it's definitely an investment.. but as I've said - WELL worth it. The kids came in excited to get working everyday and they remained completely focused and on task everyday (which has been something I've found tricky with my 5th graders).

Student Sample Group Shot! :)
Student Sample

Student Sample



Student Sample

Student Sample



Student Sample: No stencils used!

Student Sample

Student Sample

Student Sample

3
© Art with Mrs. Nguyen 2016. Powered by Blogger.